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Discover America

Maryland
( The Free State / The Old Line State )
Maryland Map It's believed that Lord Baltimore, who received a charter for the land in 1632, named the state after Queen Henrietta Maria, wife of King Charles I. One of the original 13 states to join the Union (in 1788), Maryland is in the middle of the Eastern Seaboard. The Mason and Dixon line - marking the boundary between Pennsylvania and Maryland - was drawn in the 1760s to settle a dispute between the Penn and Calvert families. In addition it is the traditional boundary between the North and the South. Chesapeake Bay, which cuts deep into Maryland, provides the state with several excellent harbors including Baltimore and Annapolis, the home of the United States Naval Academy. The long Chesapeake Bay shoreline offers opportunities for boating, fishing and swimming. Old mansions and historic sites throughout the state appeal to visitors. One of Maryland's most famous annual events is the Preakness Stakes, a horse race run each May at the Pimlico race track in Baltimore. Some of the famous celebrities that were born in Maryland include: Sisqo, Edward Norton, Babe Ruth, David Hasselhoff,

The Flag of Maryland
Maryland state flag Ratified the Constitution in 1788 as the seventh State; flag adopted in 1904. The coat of arms of the Lords Baltimore unites symbols of the Calvert and Crossland families. Maryland has used similar flags since at least 1638.
 

Largest Cities in the State
(2000) Baltimore, 651,154; Frederick, 52,767; Gaithersburg, 52,613; Bowie, 50,269; Rockville, 47,388; Hagerstown, 36,687; Annapolis, 35,838; College Park, 24,657; Salisbury, 23,743; Cumberland, 21,518
 
Business and Trade in Maryland
Agriculture: Seafood, poultry and eggs, dairy products, nursery stock, cattle, soybeans, corn.

Industries: Electric equipment, food processing, chemical products, printing and publishing, transportation equipment, machinery, primary metals, coal, tourism.

State Symbols and Emblems
  • Bird: Baltimore Oriole
  • Flower: Black-Eyed Susan (rudbeckia hirta)
  • Tree: White Oak
  • Song(s): Maryland, My Maryland
  • Motto: Fatti Maschii Parole Femine (Manly deeds, womanly words)

Maryland Travel - Vacation Destinations & Recreation
National parks and historic locations suitable for family vacations or day trips.

Janes Island State Park - Crisfield
Antietam National Cemetery - Sharpsburg
Seneca Creek State Park - Gaithersburg
Herrington Manor State Park - Oakland
B&O Railroad Museum - Baltimore
capital  Capital: Annapolis

statehood  Statehood: 1788-04-28

population  Population:
5,296,486 (541.9 mi2)

geographic area   Geographic Area (mi2)
    Total 12,406.68
    Water 2,632.86
    Land 9,773.82
    Rank 42nd Largest

education   State Education:
    Pub & Prv Schools
    College & University
    Libraries

border states   Border States: Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia

state health   Health Information:
    Illicit Drug Use

housing   Housing: In Maryland, there are 2,145,283 housing units, averaging to 219.5 per sq mile.

state magazines  Related Magazines:
 
Posters and Artwork
Houses Along a Road, Seaberry, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Houses Along a Road, Seaberry, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Photographic Print 24" x 8"

 
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Data Sources: US State Department, DOS IIP, and NetCent Communications' Development.